Sixth Summer School on Federalism, Multinationalism and the Future of Europe

The sixth edition of the CCCU and CIFE (Centre International de Formation Européene) summer school on ‘Federalism, Multinationalism and the Future of Europe’ took place in Canterbury between 13th and 24th of August. Bringing together twenty students from 11 different countries, including France, Germany, Myanmar, Nepal, Spain and the UK, students participated in a range of activities to develop and broaden their knowledge and understanding of federalism, both in theory and practice.

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How can our local businesses make a success of Brexit?

Noora Virtanen, Graduate Coordinator of the Centre for European Studies (CEFEUS) at Canterbury Christ Church University, reflects on the fall of Southern Salads and explains how findings from the latest CEFEUS report can help to mitigate the economic impact of Brexit on Kent.

The BBC reported yesterday that Southern Salad, based in Tonbridge, would be making more than 250 people redundant following the pound’s devaluation since the EU Referendum. According to the company’s administrators, the business had become unsustainable as “the sudden decline in sterling was not foreseen by the company”, which eventually placed a severe strain on their cash-flow.

The recent report ‘Kent and Medway: Making a Success of Brexit: A Sectoral Appraisal of SMEs and the Rural Economy’ produced by the Centre for European Studies (CEFEUS), one of three reports published so far, indicated similar concerns for these sectors. While overall business confidence improved since late 2016, small businesses face challenges on both domestically and in terms of the future relationship with the European Union – for instance, 64.5% of businesses in the UK have seen an increase in operating costs stemming from fuel costs, the weaker pound and inflationary pressures.

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A student view on the GE2017 result: Canterbury and Whitstable constituency, thank you.

One week after the 2017 UK General Election, our student Liz Bailey offers a commentary on the result in Canterbury and Whitstable from a student’s perspective

Credits: Adam Scotti (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

The UK’s First-Past-The-Post system has always made politics seem like a losing battle in Canterbury. This seat is a Conservative safe seat of over 160 years, with the 2015 election producing a 10,000 vote majority to ex-MP and arch-conservative Sir Julian Brazier. From the start of the snap election it seemed like business as usual for non-Conservative voters, put up a fair fight but have a graceful defeat to the Tories. However, this was no ordinary general election. This time it was personal.

Students from all over Canterbury have always had the ability to oust Brazier, but have never had a big enough push to do so. Students would vote in home constituencies or not vote at all. The EU referendum was the first spark in this almighty fire that has led to Brazier’s fall from grace. Young people turned out in record numbers to show their support for the EU nationwide but were brushed aside when the results came out. The Conservatives continued to undermine young people, increasing tuition fees and slashing funds for things we all hold dear like the NHS. Brazier, in particular, being so pro hard Brexit, homophobic and generally an outdated relic began to creep into Canterbury residents’ crosshairs.

Polls had suggested that Canterbury could be a swing seat, but it was too good to be true, right? Never trust the polls, they were wrong about the last election and the referendum. It’s a safe seat, they’re the unsinkable ships that harbour thousands of loyal Tories. But like the RMS Titanic this safe seat had an iceberg. Rosie Duffield. A new Labour candidate who is passionately dedicated to local issues like the Kent & Canterbury Hospital. A fresh-faced, young and energetic politician who rallied support with the young, the old and everyone in-between.

Election day gave way for an uneasy feeling, hope. Hope that just maybe the residents of Canterbury and Whitstable had come together in order to elect a real representative of this constituency. Someone who will listen to people, young and old, rich and poor. Someone who is with the times and supports everyone regardless of sexuality, religion or race. Someone who understands the residents of Canterbury and who will truly and to the best of their ability fight for this city. Nationwide Labour stole seats left and right, and although Labour didn’t win this election (in terms of getting 326 seats) they certainly did not lose it either.

May called this election in the hope that young people would remain complacent in politics. She, without a second thought, disregarded the importance of young people. The Conservatives lost and hope has won. Any result except a Tory landslide would have been a victory for me, but I could have never anticipated the result in Canterbury. I always thought of safe seats as a large dominating force and I was right. What I was wrong about was the ability of progressive people to come together to form an even bigger force and decimate a 10,000 vote majority. For this reason, I thank you, to all of those who voted Labour (either by preference or tactically). I thank those who dedicated hours to campaigning. I thank the young people who said enough is enough. I thank Rosie Duffield for being an amazing candidate. I thank Canterbury and Whitstable constituency for breaking the mould. But above all, I thank Theresa May, who without her disregard for progressive people she would have never called this election. Without her complacency we would have never have had the push we needed to oust Brazier, or see the true impact that we can have on politics.

Liz Bailey is second year undergraduate student in Politics at Canterbury Christ Church University. She currently works as communication manager for the Centre for European Studies (CEFEUS) and as a research assistant for the politics team at CCCU.
She tweets @LizzieBailey96

INDYREF2: A bold but unsurprising move from Nicola Sturgeon

The gauntlet is down.

To the surprise of many Nicola Sturgeon announced today that she will seek a second referendum on Scottish independence to be held between autumn 2018 and spring 2019. She is set to ask the Scottish Parliament for permission to do so next, yet given that there is a majority of pro-independence MSPs (the SNP and the Greens), this part should be pretty straightforward. The first hurdle will come from the UK Government which will have to approve the Scottish first minister’s request for a section 30 order transferring temporary powers to Holyrood to hold a referendum. Legally, Prime Minister Theresa May could refuse to grant legal permission to hold a referendum, but I think this looks unlikely. Jeremy Corbyn has also confirmed that the Labour Party would not block such a request.

Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon | photo via firstminister.gov.scot

What is likely, however, is that the Prime Minister will play hard ball on the issue, particularly over timing. In the previous independence referendum, the then First Minister Alex Salmond, was given considerable freedom to choose a referendum date. However, this time around negotiations will not be so simple. There will be further deliberations on the question(s), the franchise (will 16-17 year olds be allowed to vote as was the case in 2014?), and the timing. It may well be that Theresa May’s agreement to another referendum will hinge on the last issue, given under condition that that it is not held until Brexit negotiations are over. The issue now is not whether there will be another referendum, but when.

Calling the referendum is, as I have argued previously, potentially the most important decision of Nicola Sturgeon’s premiership. She made it clear this morning that calling for a referendum is a result of the British government’s refusal to move ‘even an inch in pursuit of compromise and agreement’. With speculation that Article 50 will be triggered in the coming days, the Scottish First Minister’s pre-emptive strike may make the British Government think again on some of its negotiating positions. I find it unlikely, however, that Scotland will be given a special deal in the Brexit negotiations.

Theresa May has hitherto avoided saying whether she will grant or block the Scottish government’s request. It is a given that she will campaign for a ‘No’ to independence vote. Nevertheless, Brexit indisputably has introduced a new and challenging dynamic to the independence debate that both sides will need to contend with in a future referendum campaign. For the unionists, Sturgeon’s bold move today will be seen as reckless and opportunist, an attempt to further complicate the Brexit negotiations and strengthen the case for independence. This is exemplified by Theresa May’s official spokesperson noting that ‘another referendum would be divisive and cause huge economic uncertainty at the worst possible time’. For pro-independence supporters, however, independence is painted as an alternative to the potential economic uncertainty of Brexit. The Scottish voters, they argue, must have a choice: Hard Brexit Britain or an Independent Scotland.

It seems the future of Scotland is destined to be outside one (if not both) of the unions of which it is currently a member. Support for independence has not dramatically risen since either the 2014 independence referendum or the 2016 Brexit referendum and while it is currently around the 50%, it has yet to remain steady above this threshold. It remains to be seen how the impending Brexit negotiations will influence the independence issue, but a hard Brexit or indeed the prospect of no deal at the end of the negotiations have merely fuelled and emboldened SNP demands for another referendum. It is a bold move for Sturgeon. She will either go down in history as the first minister who presided over the independence of Scotland, or the leader who got it spectacularly wrong.

Let the games begin!

Paul Anderson is a PhD researcher at Canterbury Christ Church University. His main research focuses on territorial autonomy and secessionist movements in western plurinational democracies.

An extended version of this blog post appeared on the LSE EUROPP Blog on 14 March 2017.

PhD Scholarship opportunities in Politics & IR at Canterbury Christ Church University

Canterbury Christ Church University welcomes applications for generous full-time PhD scholarships available for UK/EU and international applicants. Scholarships include a stipend of £13,000 p.a. and a tuition fee waiver for three years. Applications are invited across a range of subjects and themes including Politics & International Relations (section ‘Social and Applied Sciences’).

Application closing date: 18 April 2017

Registration date: 1 October 2017

To apply, email your potential supervisor and visit CCCU’s “How to apply” pages.

PhD supervision in Politics & International Relations

cccu-politics-ir-phd-supervisors

Politics and International Relations at CCCU offers PhD supervision by experienced and research-active staff across a wide range of areas. Check out our staff and their research interests below:

  • Dr Andre Barrinha: International Relations Theories, Security Studies, European Security, Turkish Foreign Policy, Portuguese Foreign Policy, Technology and the changing character of security
  • Dr David Bates: Contemporary and radical political thought, Marxism, Hardt and Negri, Occupy, Arts and Politics, New Social Movements
  • Dr Mark Bennister: Political leadership (any aspect), British politics, Australian politics, party politics, parliamentary study, executive politics, political oratory and rhetoric
  • Dr Laura Cashman: Migration, minority politics, Critical Race Theory, Romani integration in the Czech Republic, Romaphobia and populism in the EU, experiences of migrants to the UK
  • Dr Amelia Hadfield: Common Security and Defence Policy, Energy Governance, EU Neighbourhood & Development policy, EU foreign policy, International and diplomatic history.
  • Dr Soeren Keil: Territorial autonomy, conflict resolution, post-conflict societies, Western Balkans, federalism, Myanmar, Syria, Federalism
  • Dr Sarah Lieberman: EU environmental policies and governance, the politics of space, Institutions, History of EU integration, decision-making and policies.

To apply, email your potential supervisor and visit CCCU’s “How to apply” pages.

External funding available

alternative-guide-to-postgrad-funding

In addition to our own scholarships, we offer assistance in finding alternative, external funding opportunities. Please email alternativefundingguide@canterbury.ac.uk to log in if you are a prospective CCCU student and gain access to The Alternative Guide to Postgraduate Funding. Use this free database to find funding opportunities and access guidance and tools to help you prepare a winning grant application. Link: https://www.postgraduate-funding.com/gateway